Tag Archives: Cold

Mint and Lemon Iced Green Tea

I actually made this a few days ago, when it was 95 degrees and humid outside (and inside).  Today it’s more like 60 degrees and cold, and raining, and I’m wrapped in a blanket drinking tea of the hot and English breakfast variety.  But because I know it’s going to rapidly return to the boiling point, I’m going to post this anyway.  We’ll be better off prepared for what’s coming.

This is an iced tea recipe I found online a few years ago and wrote down on a notepad.  That was pre-blog, when I was unaware that I would be posting my favorite recipes for the world to view, and I should probably be able to cite from whence they came.  So if this is your recipe, please tell me and I’ll gladly let everyone know!  I’m sure I’ve changed it a bit since I originally found it, so it may be unrecognizable by now, anyway.

Sorry.

Mint and Lemon Iced Green Tea (serves 6-8)

  • 6 bags of green tea
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 bunches of mint (10-12 good-sized leaves)
  • 2 quarts boiling water
  • 10-15 ice cubes

This is a pretty simple recipe, and I’ll warn you–I used to add sugar into the boiling water, but this year Fritz and I stopped adding sugar to our beverages.  It took a little getting used to, but now everything tastes just as good as it used to.  Amazing how sugar feels absolutely necessary until you just stop using it.  But if you want to, you still can.  I think the original recipe called for 1/3 C? Maybe even 1/2 C of sugar.

Anyway, heat up the two quarts of water until boiling, then add the tea bags and take it off the heat.  That’s important–don’t boil the tea bags, ’cause it won’t taste good.  Just let them steep in the hot water for eight minutes.

While the tea is steeping, slice the lemons in half.  I usually cut off a few thin slices to put in the pitcher, and juice the rest.  Rinse the mint leaves and tear them in half.  Toss them in the bottom of the pitcher, along with the ice.

Once the tea is ready, remove the tea bags and pour the green tea over the ice.

This is also important–let this tea rest for a while!  It’s really good the next day, when it’s icy cold and the mint and lemon flavor are really strong.  You should probably make this tea the day before you want to use it, but at least a few hours.  The mint is what makes this perfect for a hot summery day, so it’s worth the wait.

Enjoy with a barbeque, or day by the pool, or you can take it to class like I did so you can imagine you are at the beach.

This recipe is also easily doubleable, and it looks very pretty at a party with the mint and lemon in the pitcher.  You could also put a little sprig in each person’s glass.

And hey, you could spike it with a little spiced rum, too…if you wanted.  Just sayin’.

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Filed under Beverages

Soba Noodles with Orange-Ginger Miso Dressing

Despite that there were a few flakes of snow threatening my peace of mind yesterday,I was so glad that today was a (chilly) but beautifully sunny day–still light out at seven!  I went to the gym today for the first time since midterm week started, and even though it was hard getting back into the swing of things, it’s nice to experience that post-workout high again (it helped that the sun was just setting as I left the gym).

However, I have to admit something to you about the upcoming recipe.  It’s all about a cold soba noodle salad, with an orange-ginger miso dressing–perfect for a quick lunch during midterms week when Fritz wasn’t around.  Except…midterms week was last week.  I made this an entire week ago.

This isn’t normally much of a problem, except that I didn’t write the amounts of anything that I used, so I have to kind of guess at what actually went into this dressing.  Luckily I have pictures as a reminder.  It was really good though, so I’d like to suggest that you use this recipe as an inspiration for a soba salad of your own–and if you do use my recipe, taste it as you go an adjust accordingly to your taste.

For myself I’ve found that’s true of any recipe using miso–I am still getting used to the strong and salty taste of miso, so I like to go slow as it is.  Miso and I are still taking baby steps as we get to know each other. 

No rushing into this relationship.

Cold Soba Salad with an Orange-Ginger Miso Dressing

  • 6-8 oz uncooked soba noodles
  • 2-3 carrots, peeled and shredded
  • 1/2 red bell pepper, diced (I’d definitely roast the pepper first next time)
  • 1-1 1/2 T miso
  • 2 T grated ginger
  • juice of one small orange (I used a tangelo)
  • 2 T tahini

Cook the soba noodles as instructed on the packaging (it only takes a few minutes in boiling water) and douse them with cold water once they are done to prevent them from overcooking.

Once they’ve cooled off and been drained, add the shredded carrots and bell pepper.

Next, mix the last four ingredients together to make a dressing.

Pour that right over the noodle mixture.

Give the noodles a good toss, and there you have it!

A light but filling (and healthy) salad.  Perfect for a meal on the go, or as a side dish for a heartier meal.

Tomorrow I plan on making a cake in the morning to celebrate our friends Steve and Gill’s first anniversary (congrats guys!) and then Fritz and I are having dinner at the Jensen’s house.  Should be a lovely day.

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Filed under Side Dishes, Vegetarian

Sesame Soba Noodle Salad

I have a nice lunch recipe here for you:

Fritz and I just had a mini-vacation.  It’s actually still happening–since we’ve studied every night and day for the past two weeks, we decided to give ourselves a break.  We made a steak dinner, had a glass of wine, and watched a movie on the pull-out couch/bed (we don’t have a tv in our bedroom).  But don’t worry.  Study time is rapidly approaching as this movie (The Duchess) is coming to a close and I finish blogging.

Alas.

We had a guest speaker in class today who talked about “mindedness”, and I wanted to write her off as a total kook as soon as she started.  Her Powerpoint was inundated with photos of animals doing human activities, and she kept using words such as “heartfullness” and “mindstream” while she taught us about meditation.  She was also wearing a fanny pack.

However, she did say one thing that really stood out to me:

Our thoughts are real.  They are just not always the truth.

I struggle on and off with accepting myself as who I am, and not worrying about whether I’ve gained one, two, or five pounds–not on an eating disorder level, but just as your average woman trying to love herself.  Why does a number on the scale mean so much to me–and my happiness?  There’s a lot of pressure from our society on women to subscribe to an ideal that is frankly less than ideal for our health.   But what impact does this have on me?  For one, the thoughts I have are real; they have to be acknowledged at the very least, and preferably dealt with.  Secondly, they are not necessarily true, just because I think them over and over.  I have to learn to identify false thoughts and give them less value and frankly power over my mind.

Anyway, just something to think about.

While you’re thinking about that, eat some of this cold salad.  I ran across some buckwheat soba noodles in the grocery store the other day and decided to give them a try–instant love affair.  They have the greatest texture and the taste is just smoother than any other whole-wheat noodle out there.  Combine it with sesame and wow.

Sesame Soba Noodle Salad

  • 6 oz dry soba noodles (I used half a package)
  • 1 t tahini (or sesame oil)
  • 1/2 small onion, minced finely
  • 1 t apple cider vinegar (rice wine vinegar would be even better, I presume)
  • 4 t soy sauce (reduced sodium)
  • 1-2 t honey or agave
  • 1/4 C sesame seeds
  • handful of button mushrooms, washed and sliced

Introducing the soba noodle!:

Cook the noodles as instructed–in boiling water for 5 or 6 minutes, until softened but not mushy.  Make sure that you have some cold/ice water to dump them into when they’re finished so they don’t overcook–plus this is a cold salad, so it works.

Meanwhile, toast the sesame seeds in a dry pan over medium heat until brown.  Browned but not burned.

Set them aside.  In a skillet, add the onions, tahini, soy sauce, and honey and stir over medium heat until a nice brown, thick sauce forms.  Toss in the mushrooms and stir them up until they soften.  Yum.

Drain the soba noodles and place them into a bowl; pour the sauce over the top. 

Top with the toasted sesame seeds and combine.  Inhale.  Just serve yourself up a nicely sized bowl right away and eat it up.  Yum.

 

This salad is quite refreshing, cold as it is.  Definitely perfect as a summer salad, so remember this in a few months when you are feeling hungry!

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Filed under Entrees